My name is Letrice. I'm 20. I believe in feminism. This includes but is not limited to: Stuff relating to feminism/racism/other activist stuff, movies, books, music, and occasionally k-pop. Sorry for that last one.

When a white teenager named Steve Lohner was stopped by the police last month and refused to show his ID after carrying a loaded shotgun on the streets of Aurora, Colorado (the same city where a mass murderer killed 12 people and injured 70 others in a packed movie theater in July 2012), the teen walked away with nothing but a citation.

But when a 22-year-old black kid named John Crawford picked up a mere BB gun in a Walmart store in Dayton, Ohio last week, customers called the police, who then shot and killed him.

Here lies a racial disparity that’s difficult for honest people to ignore. How can black people openly carry a real gun when we can’t even pick up a BB gun in a store without arousing suspicion? The answer in America is that the Second Amendment doesn’t really apply to black people.

By

Keith Boykin, "Does the Second Amendment Only Apply to White People?" (via holygoddamnshitballs)

True, anyone who’s been paying attention knows this. The only time you can get gun control passed in this country is when politicians start seeing POC walking around freely with guns.

(via questionall)

Reblogged from radmax  6,256 notes

phoenixfalls:

I remember talking to my mother and seeing Snow White and wondering if there’d ever be Chocolate Brown or something like that. But my parents were very good at making sure I had dolls that looked like me, and books with brown children in them, and birthday cards with brown children on them. They were very aware. When you discount a child from fantasy, it’s a very strong statement. You think, Wow, somebody made an entire movie with elves, and trees that talk, and things that fly, and there was no room for me.

Anika Noni Rose in Vanity Fair. (Interview by Alex Beggs; Photographs by Justin Bishop.)

I need people to stop using “black-on-black” violence as a way of derailing conversation about police brutality and potentially racially-charged crimes. I need you to stop appropriating inner-city violence in a conversation as if you actually care about such violence or the lives of impoverished black folk. I need you to understand that police brutality is 100% real. I need you to understand that some criminals and murders are afforded the privilege of being humanized and painted as complex individuals by the media while others are not.  I need you to remember the history of atrocious, sickening violence this country has against black and other people of color for no reason other than the color of their skin and put that into context when thinking about people’s anger over what may be a racially-motivated crime. I need you to realize that prejudice and discrimination does not just disappear entirely with time. It trickles down and becomes less obvious.

Reblogged from kceyagi  371 notes

JL: How can consumers encourage more diversity in movies?

IS: Avoid buying tickets to films which clearly rely on stereotypes or demeaning portrayals of people based on gender, race, class, age, sexual orientation, ability, or circumstance. And anytime you do watch a film, give it The Representation Test afterward. The test grades films on their inclusiveness pertaining to all those above categories. When a movie scores really low on the test, use #NotBuyingIt on Twitter to let the filmmakers and all your friends know how you feel. Since so much of this industry is based on money, this is one way we can express our discontent and get the attention of the studios. By

Where’s the Diversity, Hollywood? Sci-Fi and Fantasy Blockbusters Overwhelmingly White, Male

Here’s the link to the Representation Test.

(via tubooks)

Reblogged from reverseracism  13,213 notes

blastortoise:

When a POC reads a lot, gets good grades or speaks with naturally with an expansive vocabulary and white people say ” haah you are so WHITE!”

What they really are saying is “I don’t associate those positive attributes with being a poc because your people don’t do any of that. Only white people are capable of that.”

Reblogged from hardhatpartycat  74,240 notes

White men make up approximately 36% of the population, but commit 75% of mass shootings. What would be called terrorism by any other skin tone is suddenly some mysterious unnamed disease. We as a society are perfectly happy to further stigmatize mentally ill people, who are far more likely to be victims of violence than commit violence, in the service of protecting white supremacy and male entitlement. By

The “Mental Illness” We Refuse To Name: White Male Entitlement | Constituative Outsider

Resubmitting this because the original did not cite the original author, and plagirizing of WoC’s work is a serious and rampant issue. We cannot allow them to do this difficult work without acknowledging the value of their work. If you reblogged, please delete the original and reblog this version.

(via shitrichcollegekidssay)

Reblogged from kceyagi  3,863 notes

I’m talking with a boy. He’s at that age when the edges of the man he will become are just starting to press against his baby-round face. He’s got his first opinions and ideas and jokes, which are horrible, because there is nothing that boys his age love more than corny jokes. There is a whole industry of knock-knock-joke books for boys this age. Everything about him is gangly; his voice and his limbs fit awkwardly, like hand-me-downs. He’s young enough that his smile is easy, and he is the kind of boy who finds reasons to smile in everything: the cracking of his voice, a fire-engine siren, the fact that a grown-up is talking to him and listening to what he says. When I talk with kids like this, our conversations always seem to go the same way:

“So you’re telling me these are all the books published last year for kids?” they ask me. “That’s a lot of books. That’s more books than I could read in a year.”

There was something missing. I saw that these characters, these lives, were not mine.

“Yep, it’s a few thousand.”

“And in all of those thousands of books, I’m just not in them?”

“Well…um…yes.”

“Are there books about talking animals?”

“Oh, sure.”

“And crazy magical futures?”

“Absolutely.”

“And superpowers? And the olden days when people dressed funny? And all the combinations of those things? Like talking animals with superpowers in magical futures … but no me?”

“No you.”

“Why?”

“Because you’re brown.”

By "The Apartheid of Children’s Literature" (via cauda-pavonis)